Book - Scaling Lean and Agile - Thinking and Organizational Tools

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Contents

Amazon

Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Thinking & Organizational Tools for Large-Scale Scrum

Introduction

Reflecting our work over recent years, this text explores scaling lean and agile development with Large-Scale Scrum. It was written with my co-author Bas Vodde, who has long and in-depth experience with very large agile product development and enterprise transformations (at Nokia Networks and NSN), and like me, has worked in large embedded systems.

This books explores the foundation for a successful enterprise transformation to large-scale lean or agile product development: the thinking tools and organizational redesign tools necessary to lay the foundation for new practices. Without leadership (and others) that understand and institute these foundational elements, it is difficult to succeed with applying the practices.

Companion Book: Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development

This book is related to a second companion book that explores the more concrete practices in scaling lean and agile product development: Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Successful Large, Multisite & Offshore Products with Large-Scale Scrum

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Sample Chapters


Table of Contents

1. Introduction

Thinking Tools

2. Systems Thinking
3. Lean Thinking 
4. Queueing Theory
5. False Dichotomies
6. Be Agile

Organizational Tools

7.   Feature Teams
8.   Teams
9.   Requirement Areas
10. Organization
11. Large-Scale Scrum

Miscellany

12. Scrum Primer
Recommended Readings
Scaling lean and agile dev - cover.jpg

Errata from 1st printing (corrected in 2nd printing, Oct 2009)

Page 34

To develop and “optimize the whole” culture, ...
--->
To develop an “optimize the whole” culture, ...


Page 40

Toyota is a strong, resilient, company...
--->
Toyota is a strong, resilient company...


'Page 44

The English term ‘lean’ was chosen for the Toyota system—by MIT researchers of Toyota in The Machine That Changed the World [WJR90]—to contrast their lean production with the alternative of mass production.
--->
The English term ‘lean’ was chosen for the Toyota system—and popularized by MIT researchers of Toyota in The Machine That Changed the World [WJR90]—to contrast their lean production with the alternative of mass production.

Comment: Subtle (unintentional) mis-attribution. Wikipedia: The term was first coined by John Krafcik in a Fall 1988 article, "Triumph of the Lean Production System," published in the Sloan Management Review and based on his master's thesis at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Krafcik had been a quality engineer in the Toyota-GM NUMMI joint venture in California before coming to MIT for MBA studies.


Page 49

Aushi Niimi ...
--->
Atsushi Niimi ...


Page 79

...and starts to introduce cadence into system that had very little.
--->
..and starts to introduce cadence into a system that had very little.


Page 167

...by asking the underutilized team for advice...
--->
...by asking the underutilized team for advice on what to do...

Comment: Clarification.


Page 197

And they create queues between the teams, which reduces the total cycle time...
--->
And they create queues between the teams, which increases the total cycle time...

Comment: Mis-wording -> incorrect. OOPS!!!


Page 207

...decisions making method...
--->
...decision-making method...


Page 212

Self-organizing, cross-functional, “resource balanced,” feature teams...
--->
Self-organizing, cross-functional, “resource-balanced,” feature teams...

Comment: The Fowler brothers, first editors of the Concise Oxford Dictionary, wrote in their preface to the 1911 edition: We have also to admit that after trying hard at an early stage to arrive at some principle that should teach us when to separate, when to hyphen, and when to unite the parts of compound words, we had to abandon the attempt as hopeless, and welter in the prevailing chaos.


Page 232

A related impediment is the mistaken belief that improvement in large product groups would take nothing less than several years, given the level of institutionalized problems.
--->
A related impediment is the wishful thinking that significant improvement in large product groups can and will happen “fast,” within only a few years, rather than what we see as the more likely five or ten years—if there is sustained executive support.

Comment: The meaning of the original sentence was confusing.


Page 294 When there are multiple teams there are many product items...
--->
When there are multiple teams there are many Product Backlog items...

Comment: Clarification.